Daniel A. Reed

The Shifting World of Net Neutrality

Communications of the ACM, April 2018
By Daniel A. Reed

“Then there is the woefully obsolete nature of the governing law – the Communications Act of 1934. Yes, you read that right – 1934! There have been updates, most recently the Telecommunications Act of 1996, but twenty years is a geologic eon at Internet speed.”

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Dawn of the Code War

Dawn of the Code War: America’s Battle Against Russia, China, and the Rising Global Cyber Threat

“The inside story of how America’s enemies launched a cyber war against us-and how we’ve learned to fight back…”

Includes links to:

  • “The Lawfare Podcast: John Carlin on ‘Dawn of the Code War’“ by Jen Patja Howell. Saturday, November 24, 2018.

  • A discussion on responses to national security threats in cyberspace from the Department of Justice, featuring John P. Carlin, Former Assistant Attorney General, National Security Division; and John C. Demers, Assistant Attorney General, National Security Division, on Tuesday, January 15, 2019 at the Center for Strategic & International Studies.

  • John Carlin on “Stay Tuned with Preet” Dec. 4, 2018.

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Silicon Valley: Where the Future was Born

Silicon Valley: Where the Future was Born

“SILICON VALLEY tells the story of the pioneering scientists who transformed rural Santa Clara County into the hub of technological ingenuity we now know as Silicon Valley. The film spotlights the creativity of the young men who founded Fairchild Semiconductor and in particular the brilliant, charismatic young physicist Robert Noyce.”

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Hey Google, What’s a Moonshot?: How Silicon Valley Mocks Apollo

Communications of the ACM, January 2019
By Thomas Haigh

“Letting Silicon Valley steal the term “moonshot” for projects with quite different management styles, success criteria, scales, and styles of innovation hurts our collective ability to understand just what NASA achieved 50 years ago and why nothing remotely comparable is actually under way today at Google, or anywhere else.”

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Google Tech Talks

Hiding In Plain Sight – The Secret History of Silicon Valley

Presentation by Steve Blank, Dec. 2007 & Nov. 2008

Premise of “The Secret History of Silicon Valley” is that WWII was the First Electronic War and it was the wartime urgency combined with required secrecy to create systems to counter the threat of Nazi Germany that primarily lead to the development of what is known today as Silicon Valley. The point being that popular culture and history does not include this aspect in the history of Silicon Valley, but it is nonetheless important to know this history. Further, the projects that Mr. Blank outlines were conducted in plain sight.

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A Transportation Security Administration (TSA) screener uses a biometric facial recognition scanner on a traveler at Washington Dulles International Airport.

Being Recognized Everywhere

Communications of the ACM, February 2019
By Logan Kugler

“A core challenge for democratic governments will be continued adherence to the rule of law, where restrictions on individual liberty that flow from use of this technology must be justified by necessity, legitimate purpose, and use of the least restrictive means available.”

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Tony’s Law

Communications of the ACM, February 2019
By Dror G. Feitelson

“Someone did not tighten the lid, and the ants got into the honey again. This can be prevented by placing the honey jar in a saucer of water, but it is a nuisance, occupies more counter space, and one must remember to replenish the water. So we try at least to remember to tighten the lid.

In the context of security, the software industry does not always tighten the lid. In some cases it fails to put the lid on at all, leaving the honey exposed and inviting.”

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A view of the F.B.I. National Crime Information Center in Washington in 1967. In the 1960s, lawmakers began to question the government’s gathering of Americans’ data. Photo: Bettmann, via Getty Images

The End of Privacy Began in the 1960s

The New York Times, Dec. 5, 2018
Opinion by Margaret O’Mara

“In the fall of 1965, President Lyndon Johnson’s administration announced a plan to consolidate hundreds of federal databases into one centralized National Data Bank. It was meant as an efficiency move to make the Great Society even greater.”

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Magazine Cover: What Is Code?

What Is Code?

BusinessWeek, June 11, 2015
by John Ford

“Software has been around since the 1940s. Which means that people have been faking their way through meetings about software, and the code that builds it, for generations. Now that software lives in our pockets, runs our cars and homes, and dominates our waking lives, ignorance is no longer acceptable. The world belongs to people who code. Those who don’t understand will be left behind.”

“This issue comprises a single story devoted to ­demystifying code and the culture of the people who make it. There’s some technical language along with a few pretty basic mathematical concepts. There are also lots of solid jokes and lasting insights. It may take a few hours to read, but that’s a small price to pay for adding decades to your career.”

—Josh Tyrangiel

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What Children Want to Know About Computers

Communications of the ACM, October 19, 2018
By Judy Robertson

“There’s a mismatch between what we teach children about computing at school and what they want to know. More than a decade ago computer science educators coined the phrase computational thinking to refer to the unique cleverness of the way computer scientists approach problem solving. “Our thinking is based on abstraction, decomposition, generalization, and pattern matching”, we said, “and everyone will find it useful to think like this in their everyday lives. So please stop asking us to fix your printer.”

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