10 Things All Software Engineers Should Know

10 Things All Software Engineers Should Know

I am in the interesting position at the moment of managing a team of people writing software who have almost no training or experience in software development. I find two things truly remarkable: first, that any modestly sophisticated working system can be made using code written by people that know almost nothing about software, and second, that smart people, who are motivated, can learn how to do things better pretty quickly.

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A List Apart – Illustration by Dougal MacPherson

From URL to Interactive

When we think about it, our whole industry depends on our faith in a handful of “black boxes” few of us fully understand: browsers. We hand over our HTML, CSS, JavaScript, cross our fingers, and hope they render the experience we have in our heads. But knowing how they work can really get you out of a jam when things go wrong. That’s why we’ve assembled a handful of incredibly knowledgeable authors to take us under the hood in this four-part series. Join us on this trip across the web, into the often foggy valley between code and experience.

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Adding Custom Code

Adding Custom Code

One of the things that you can do to customize your website is to add custom code. This resource will provide you with information you need to get started. If you are not comfortable with HTML, CSS and/or JavaScript coding then take a look at a couple of the other resources I’ve listed: Learning Web Design (book) and W3Schools.com which provides a wealth of info on those forms of coding.

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Magazine Cover: What Is Code?

What Is Code?

BusinessWeek, June 11, 2015
by John Ford

“Software has been around since the 1940s. Which means that people have been faking their way through meetings about software, and the code that builds it, for generations. Now that software lives in our pockets, runs our cars and homes, and dominates our waking lives, ignorance is no longer acceptable. The world belongs to people who code. Those who don’t understand will be left behind.”

“This issue comprises a single story devoted to ­demystifying code and the culture of the people who make it. There’s some technical language along with a few pretty basic mathematical concepts. There are also lots of solid jokes and lasting insights. It may take a few hours to read, but that’s a small price to pay for adding decades to your career.”

—Josh Tyrangiel

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