gold box with circuit board exterior, illustration - Credit: Arleksey / Shutterstock

Better Security Through Obfuscation

Last year, three mathematicians published a viable method for hiding the inner workings of software. The paper was a culmination of close to two decades of work by multiple teams around the world to show that concept could work. The quest now is to find a way to make indistinguishability obfuscation (iO) efficient enough to become a practical reality.

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Workers at the Idaho National Laboratory’s Critical Infrastructure Test Range. (Flickr/Idaho National Laboratory, CC BY 2.0)

The Myth of Consumer-Grade Security

Schneier on Security, August 28, 2019
By Bruce Schneier

“The Department of Justice wants access to encrypted consumer devices but promises not to infiltrate business products or affect critical infrastructure. Yet that’s not possible, because there is no longer any difference between those categories of devices. Consumer devices are critical infrastructure. They affect national security. And it would be foolish to weaken them, even at the request of law enforcement.”

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The End of Encryption? NSA & FBI Seek New Backdoors Against Advice from Leading Security Experts

Democracy Now!, July 8, 2015
By Juan González & Amy Goodman
Guest: Bruce Schneier

“FBI Director James Comey is set to testify against encryption before the Senate Intelligence Committee today, as the United States and Britain push for “exceptional access” to encrypted communications. Encryption refers to the scrambling of communications so they cannot be read without the correct key or password. The FBI and GCHQ have said they need access to encrypted communications to track criminals and terrorists. Fourteen of the world’s pre-eminent cryptographers, computer scientists and security specialists have issued a paper arguing there is no way to allow the government such access without endangering all confidential data, as well as the broader communications infrastructure. We speak with one of the authors of the paper, leading security technologist Bruce Schneier..”

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